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Time for Timber Exhibit
 

This exhibit, housed in the University of Texas at Austin Mebane Gallery,  presented six innovative mass-timber structures in North America and Europe. It also served as the backdrop for a one-day symposium of the same name. The invited speakers for the event were Michelle Addington, Grace Jeffers, Jan-Peter Koppitz, and Andrew Waugh.

 

 

Completed: 2018

Graphic Design: Masha Eizner

Photographer: Paul Finkel

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Blanton Museum of Art
 

“You Belong Here” was the title given to the reinstallation of the permanent collection at one of Texas’ premier art institutions. Along with this came the opportunity to not only reconsider the museum’s major holdings, but also the overall visitor experience. For the first time in over a decade, the museum underwent a significant transformation. The main entry, which looked more corporate than cultural, was strategically addressed to improve it aesthetically and functionally, allowing for a more intuitive check-in process. All existing gallery furnishings were refurbished and new contemporary modular seating was added in the communal areas to create more opportunities for visitors to relax and socialize. New wayfinding and environmental graphics bring a fresh, bold approach to aid visitors with orientation.

 

 

Completed: 2017

Creative direction in collaboration with Masha Eizner and Meng Ke (graphic design) and Cassandra Smith (Manager of Exhibitions)

Photographer: Colin Doyle

Mountain Villa Residence

 

The complete interior and exterior renovation of this 1980s residence originally designed by Alan Taniguchi enhances the existing structure’s formal language, while addressing the owner’s programmatic requirements. The new open plan promotes social interaction, and transitional spaces blur the boundary between inside and outside. Natural finishes including wood, stone, leather, and linen are juxtaposed against glass and steel for a warm modernism. Besides the overall services and functional updates, the remodel includes a number of special details including a starlight pendant installation as well as a steel staircase with leather-wrapped treads. The sensitive but far from reserved design respectfully renews the spirit of the landmark house for a contemporary lifestyle that reflects today’s values.

Size: 4,375 sf

Completed: 2011

Contractor: Pilgrim Building Company

Furnishings/Art: Scott + Cooner, RAD, Deborah Page Projects

Photographer: Paul Finkel

Sundown Residence

This transformative project has evolved into an architectural exploration of experimental materials and skillfully interwoven interior spaces. The hands-on team, inclusive of an engaged client who is supportive of the local design and arts community, has worked to orchestrate this one of a kind home. Rammed earth construction sets the tone for other equally rich and distinctive natural finishes. All of which serve as a backdrop to the client’s collection of family heirlooms and contemporary art.

 

Size: 4,500 sf

Completed: 2015
Collaboration with Mark Oberholzer of Rhode Partners
General Contractor: Mark Moulkers

Photographer: Paul Finkel



San Saba Drive Residence

 

A new construction residence in west Texas is the future home of two professionals with young children. The owners' clean and contemporary aesthetic is demonstrated throughout the project with restrained finishes and European furnishings and fixtures.



Size: 5,500 sf

Expected Completion: 2017
Collaboration with Mark Oberholzer of Rhode Partners

Ledge Mountain Residence

This budget driven renovation of a residence originally designed by architect Kirby Keahey focuses on sustainability from the reuse of structure to furnishings; considering energy efficiency, indoor air quality, ventilation, longevity, and local economies. The open plan was pushed to the extreme to create stronger physical and social connections. Low ceiling heights were mitigated by lowering floors and through the illusion created by floor-to-ceiling elements. Spatial tuning and layout adjustments are further influenced by the addition of multiple sliding glass doors that refine and add new access points to the exterior. Chalk white walls and whitewashed original pine features are punctuated by black-painted volumes and planes, creating a neutral yet graphically bold backdrop. Efforts were aimed at reconciling and augmenting renovations by previous owners, with a deliberate return to redefining the modern spirit of the original home.



Size: 2,400 sf

Completed: 2012

Photographer: Casey Dunn, James Bruce, Kirby Keahey

Skin Perfect Aesthetics Medical Spa

This medical spa is characterized by a harmonious color palette that balances soft cream tones against bold accents and natural materials inspired by plants and water. The reception is carved out by a curved, maple-paneled wall that separates the public from the treatment and back of house areas. The light-filled space is accentuated by a custom pendant that filters light in the day and glows in the evening. Changes in flooring patterns and materials aid in defining spaces. The circular pebbled “carpet” and custom leaf table form the seating area, while wood flooring indicates the pathway to the treatment rooms. In the absence of daylight, the ceiling treatment in the hallway provides diffused ambient light. A similar “skylight” is implemented in the treatment rooms, which are uniquely styled according to the aesthetician. 



Size: 3,000 sf

Completed: 2008
 

Springbox Digital Marketing Agency

Springbox began in one nineteenth-century building, but when increased business made it necessary to expand, moved into another turn-of-the-century building next door. The environmental branding and design was a three-year effort that infuses a cool aesthetic into two adjacent buildings. The inspiration for the design was found in the translation of the virtual to the actual, which is evident throughout the space with interior statements that mimic the playful style of the agency’s own website. The random carpet tile pattern has become a signature for the company. As floors were joined together, the pixilated pattern actually unifies the spaces. A life size “unfolding box” wraps over and around the existing reception desk and continues into the open work area leading visitors and staff into the space. The two founding partners occupy private offices that open up at the corners with large doors on overhead tracks, offering varying degrees of privacy.



Size: 10,000 sf

Completed: 2007

Photographer: Thomas McConnell, Andy Mattern

Dermataloge Medical Spa

The interior scheme for this aesthetic dermatologist practice is based on a simple earth tone palette that incorporates a series of architectural elements inspired by nature. A 25-foot long sculptural wall leads patients to treatment rooms, which feature high ceilings and oversized windows connecting the interior space to the exterior. Walnut floors, slatted window screens, clay wall finishes, and pebble tiles bring a new level of detail to the existing building. The luxurious spa is a dramatic transformation from the dated corporate office that was previously housed here. Without moving walls, new finishes and millwork were utilized to balance the functional and practical needs of a medical facility with the ambiance necessary to elevate the existing brand and attract a mature and sophisticated clientele.



Size: 2,800 sf

Completed: 2006
Photographer: Andy Mattern

LazerSmooth Medical Spa

Initial design conversations with the client determined that this laser hair removal center should be budget-oriented, not gender-specific, aimed at a youthful market, and most of all humorous. Taking cue from the name, the concept focuses on defining a palette of interior elements that play off the idea of smooth versus texture. With future expansion in mind, the design opts for a modern aesthetic, despite the building’s traditional exterior. Upon entry, the space is white and filled with light. Progressing toward the treatment rooms, the colors become more saturated and dramatic with small touches like door handles that light up when the room is in use. Helping the transition is a gradient wall that curves through the interior, aiding in orientation and serving as a backdrop for retail products. The element that brings a smile to everyone’s face is the “hairy” reception desk that is offset by a “smooth” check-out counter around the corner.



Size: 1,900 sf

Completed: 2007
Photographer: Andy Mattern